Funkcja defined() w Perl

W języku programowania Perl jest wbudowana funkcja defined().

Najczęściej ta funkcja jest używana, aby odróżnić wartość undef od innej wartości. Ale z pomocą defined() można dowiedzieć się czy jest zdefiniowana funkcja.

Test na undef

Główne zastosowanie funkcji defined() to sprawdzanie wartości na undef.

Jeśli przekazać funkcji defined() wartość undef, funkcja zwróci false. Funkcja zwróci prawdę w przypadku, gdy wartość która jej została wysłana jest wszystko, ale nie undef. Oto przykład kodu:

▶ Run
#!/usr/bin/perl

use Data::Dumper;

print Dumper defined(8);
print Dumper defined(0);
print Dumper defined('');
print Dumper defined(undef);

Wynik działania tego kodu:

$VAR1 = 1;
$VAR1 = 1;
$VAR1 = 1;
$VAR1 = '';

Test na to, że funkcja jest określona

Najczęściej funkcja defined() służy do tego aby odróżnić undef od innej wartości. Ale oprócz tego z pomocą defined() można dowiedzieć się czy jest zdefiniowana funkcja. Oto przykład kodu:

▶ Run
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

print Dumper defined(&check);
print Dumper defined(&Data::Dumper::Dumper);

Funkcja check() nie jest określona, więc defined() zwróci fałsz, A oto funkcja Dumper jest w pakiecie Data::Dumper i defined() zwróci prawdę. Oto co wyświetla ten program na ekran:

$VAR1 = '';
$VAR1 = 1;

Argumenty

W przypadku, gdy funkcje defined() nie zostały przekazane żadne argumenty, to funkcja działa z дефолтной zmiennej $_:

Jeśli przekazać funkcji defined() więcej niż jeden argument, to będzie błąd i wykonanie programu zostanie zatrzymane:

Too many arguments for defined operator at script.pl line 3, near "3)"
Execution of script.pl aborted due to compilation errors.

Wartość zwracana

Wynik działania funkcji defined() — to zawsze wartość logiczną. Prawda lub fałsz.

Korzystanie z tablicy i хешом

Bardzo dawno funkcja defined() pracował w szczególny sposób jeśli jej przekazać tablica lub hash jako argument. Ale już w Perl 5.8 takie wykorzystanie wydawał ostrzeżenie, a od 5.22 jest użycie stało się zawieść.

Oto przykład kodu, w którym w defined() przekazywana jest tablica:

▶ Run
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

my @arr;

print Dumper defined(@arr);

Wynik działania tego kodu w perlu wersji 5.8:

defined(@array) is deprecated at script.pl line 10.
    (Maybe you should just omit the defined()?)
    $VAR1 = '';

I wynik pracy tego samego gdy w perl 5.30:

Can't use 'defined(@array)' (Maybe you should just omit the defined()?) at script.pl line 10.

I ten sam kod, ale o hash:

▶ Run
#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

my %h;

print Dumper defined(%h);

Wyniki pracy na perl 5.8 i 5.30:

defined(%hash) is deprecated at script.pl line 10.
    (Maybe you should just omit the defined()?)
    $VAR1 = '';
Can't use 'defined(%hash)' (Maybe you should just omit the defined()?) at script.pl line 10.

Oficjalna dokumentacja

Oto wynik polecenia perldoc -f defined:

       defined EXPR
       defined Returns a Boolean value telling whether EXPR has a value other
               than the undefined value "undef".  If EXPR is not present, $_
               is checked.

               Many operations return "undef" to indicate failure, end of
               file, system error, uninitialized variable, and other
               exceptional conditions.  This function allows you to
               distinguish "undef" from other values.  (A simple Boolean test
               will not distinguish among "undef", zero, the empty string, and
               "0", which are all equally false.)  Note that since "undef" is
               a valid scalar, its presence doesn't necessarily indicate an
               exceptional condition: "pop" returns "undef" when its argument
               is an empty array, or when the element to return happens to be
               "undef".

               You may also use "defined(&func)" to check whether subroutine
               &func has ever been defined.  The return value is unaffected by
               any forward declarations of &func.  A subroutine that is not
               defined may still be callable: its package may have an
               "AUTOLOAD" method that makes it spring into existence the first
               time that it is called; see perlsub.

               Use of "defined" on aggregates (hashes and arrays) is
               deprecated.  It used to report whether memory for that
               aggregate had ever been allocated.  This behavior may disappear
               in future versions of Perl.  You should instead use a simple
               test for size:

                   if (@an_array) { print "has array elements\n" }
                   if (%a_hash)   { print "has hash members\n"   }

               When used on a hash element, it tells you whether the value is
               defined, not whether the key exists in the hash.  Use "exists"
               for the latter purpose.

               Examples:

                   print if defined $switch{D};
                   print "$val\n" while defined($val = pop(@ary));
                   die "Can't readlink $sym: $!"
                       unless defined($value = readlink $sym);
                   sub foo { defined &$bar ? &$bar(@_) : die "No bar"; }
                   $debugging = 0 unless defined $debugging;

               Note:  Many folks tend to overuse "defined" and are then
               surprised to discover that the number 0 and "" (the zero-length
               string) are, in fact, defined values.  For example, if you say

                   "ab" =~ /a(.*)b/;

               The pattern match succeeds and $1 is defined, although it
               matched "nothing".  It didn't really fail to match anything.
               Rather, it matched something that happened to be zero
               characters long.  This is all very above-board and honest.
               When a function returns an undefined value, it's an admission
               that it couldn't give you an honest answer.  So you should use
               "defined" only when questioning the integrity of what you're
               trying to do.  At other times, a simple comparison to 0 or ""
               is what you want.

               See also "undef", "exists", "ref".

Tematy pokrewne

Inne artykuły